Anonymous OpenID

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WunuSAp

Your disposable OpenID

What is this?

In short: automatic, anonymous, registration-less & disposable OpenID log-ins.

OpenID is a solution to the problem of having to keep track of usernames and passwords for sites that require log-ins. Many sites are now OpenID enabled and allow visitors to log in using only the URL of their profile on an OpenID provider such as AOL, Blogger and so on.

OpenID.Anonymity.com is an OpenID provider just like them, but we do it differently. No one has got a fixed profile here, and you don't have to sign up or register any accounts whatsoever. Rather, any OpenID profile given such as http://openid.anonymity.com/anythingHere will automatically be validated for you as an authentic log-in by Anonymity.com. If the site that you log in to ask for a name, we simply give it a randomized name such as "AnonEceSAqo." In short, OpenID.Anonymity.com is to OpenIDs what Mailinator is to e-mails.

How do I use it?

When you would like to log in to a site that you would rather not give your online identity to, look for the OpenID icon or an option to log in using OpenID. If the site accepts OpenID, it should ask you for the URL to your OpenID-enabled profile (provider). Now, rather than giving up your AOL or LiveJournal URL, simply type in http://openid.anonymity.com/whateverhere, substituting the whateverhere part with any letters and numbers of your choosing. Submit, enter in the characters on the captcha image, submit again, and that's it! The site should now recognize you as a logged in account under a fictitious name indicating your anonymity.

But won't spammers use this?

No. On the authenticate stage we ask the user to validate that they're a human by entering in a short captcha (an image containing clues as to what to type in). This prevents automated bots from using the OpenID.Anonymity.com service to spam.

It didn't work on so-and-so site!

Some OpenID-enabled sites choose to only allow OpenID authentications from certain big providers. That's their choice and there's nothing we can do about that.

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